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It’s Autumn, the leaves are falling, the air is beginning to get chilly in the morning (kind of!) and my son asked me for porridge again.

He actually loves porridge, which is wonderful… except that i have never really loved porridge and he insists that we must eat it together. Yes, yes, it’s lovely that he wants to share this with me, it’s beautiful in fact… but to be honest, i make it through about half a small bowl and start to gag a little and now that the little Miss is almost 2 and asserting herself in the food department i have to duck if she doesn’t like it… and listen to complaints of “no like it poddidge” and so on and so forth…

Porridge, in my memories is just stodge with too much sugar on top to make it palatable. Yes its lovely smothered in whole milk and lashings of golden syrup, but honestly i could just enjoy the milk & syrup and be done with it. I don’t digest it well, it sits in my stomach for so long that it gets bored and i don’t like that.

In light of my recent adventures in lacto-fermenting and soaking grains i thought i should give it another try.  So i did, and now i think i can honestly say that i might just start loving porridge… i won’t overdo it, but maybe a few times a week i can absolutely love porridge!

The process of overnight soaking with water and a little whey really lightens the load of the oats and the addition of just little bit of butter and maple (or raw honey) is just divine!! The porridge is smooth, tasty and leaves the most luxurious mouth-feel, it’s almost indescribable… all from a little overnight soak. Not to mention how incredibly fast it is. Honestly, 2 minutes to get the oats soaking and then 5 minutes in the morning – that’s fast food folks, right there!

It got the absolute tick of approval from Miss Almost 2 and Mr 4.5… although one wanted more butter and one wanted less butter and syrup… personal porridge preferences are so darn important, and i don’t deny them the freedom of choice at individualising their breakfasts. Miss Almost 2 loves her butter so she got lots, and Mr 4.5 prefers the plain taste so he got just a smidge of butter and a dash of syrup and his personal “additive” of choice, cinnamon!

The options are limitless, but Sally Fallon (Author of Nourishing Traditions) does recommend the addition of butter to assist in the absorption of vitamins and minerals… and a pinch of good quality salt goes a long way as well.

I also found that the recipe of 1 cup of oats (once soaked) was enough to serve myself, my husband and 2 small children – whereas last year, if i wanted to feed us all i cooked at least 1.5cups – much more economical to soak!

Extra butter for Miss Almost 2... and just a dash of organic maple!

Extra butter for Miss Almost 2… and just a dash of organic maple!

 

Breakfast Porridge – Inspired by Nourishing Traditions (pg 455)

1 cup oats

1 cup warm water

2 Tblspns Whey

Combine these ingredients in a bowl. Cover and leave overnight (or up to 24hrs)

In the morning:

Place 1 cup water and a pinch of salt into a saucepan and bring to the boil.

Add soaked oats and reduce the heat to low stirring for 3-5 minutes. They are ready when they reach the consistency you desire.

Serve hot with your choice of milk, cream, butter, a pinch of salt, a slurp of syrup, honey, cinnamon, nuts and/or fruit.

Enjoy!!

 

Nicole

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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It’s the latest thing isn’t it, cultured veggies. Pete Evans is doing it… and well, he’s someone isn’t he? He copped a lot of flack a while back for activating his nuts, but that’s a whole ‘nother blog post!

CULTURED VEGGIES

We’ve been eating them, or their inferior cousins, for probably our whole lives and didn’t even know it.

Saurkraut, gerkins, pickled onions… that weird cauliflower/carrot/capsicum? veggie mix in a large jar that my Pop in Queensland eats every Christmas… whatever it is, it’s made appearances, you’ve seen it right? Unfortunately, most store-bought cultured veg has been made using either vinegar and/or sugar, and low-grade salt, rendering it almost entirely useless in terms of nutritional benefit.

Traditional cultured veggies were not just a means of preserving veggies pre-refrigeration, they were also a nutritional powerhouse. Full of good bacteria, probiotics and enzymes that aid digestion. They really are good for you and should be eaten daily! Not something to be forced down, but something that actually tastes good… like those yummy little piles of pickles you eat with your indian food… or that delicious morsel of Kimchi with your Korean BBQ. Honestly, awesome!

So i thought I’d start off easy and try and make something the kids might like to. Ginger Carrots it is then!

full to the brim with carrotty goodness!

full to the brim with carrotty goodness!

Cultured Carrots – Inspired by Nourishing Traditions pg. 95

(Fermented Fruit & Vegetables)

About 8 carrots (i think i got about 3 cups worth) grated

Half tspn salt

Half tblspn Ginger powder

3 Tblspns Whey* (read more about whey here)

Combine in bowl and pound with a meat mallet or other wooden implement.

Once the juice is released, pop into a jar. Make sure the carrots are pushed down under the liquid.

Pop on a lid and place in the kitchen somewhere for 3 days.

Now you can start eating it – and store it in the fridge!

 

Nicole

x

 

UPDATE: I got to taste these, finally!!! OMG they are totally yummy. Crunchy, a little bit salty, a tiny bit vinegar-y and 100% taste-bud-tingling. I want to eat all the carrots 😀

 

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